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Calculus Classes

Courses in the Calculus Sequence

The systematic study of mathematics begins with one of the following two alterna­tive sequences:

Calculus I
Calculus II
Calculus III
Calculus IV

or

Honors Math A and B

Honors Math A-B is aimed at students with a strong interest in and aptitude for Mathematics who also have a strong Calculus background from high school. This is a course for the best prepared and most able mathematics students. It covers the material of multivariable calculus and linear algebra from a thoroughly mathematical point of view as well as other topics chosen by the instructor. This course serves as an introduction to the upper level undergraduate mathematics courses offered by the Department.

Placement in the Calculus Sequences

For the Fall Semester 2014, students with questions about Calculus Placement should come to the:

Academic Resources Fair,  Wednesday August 27, 11:00-1:00 in the Roone Arledge Auditorium, Lerner Hall

or the

Math Infosession,  Tuesday August 26, 2:30-4 in Mathematics 312. (For SEAS students)
Math Infosession, Wednesday August 27, 3:30-4:30 in Lerner Cinema. (For CC students)

School of Engineering and Applied Science Students:

  • with a score of 5 on the Calculus BC Advanced Placement (AP) exam must begin with Calculus III (or Honors Math A).
  • with a score of 4 on the Calculus BC Advanced Placement exam, or a score of 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB Advanced Placement exam must begin with Calculus II.
  • with a score of 6 or 7 on the IB HL Calculus exam, or a grade of A or B on the A-Level GCE Further Maths exams must begin with Calculus II.
  • with an A grade in a full-year high school calculus course must begin with Calculus II.
  • with other AP scores, below an A in a full year high school calculus course, or less than a full year of calculus in high school must begin with Calculus I.

Columbia College and other non-SEAS students:

  • with a score of 5 on the Calculus BC Advanced Placement, or a score of 7 on the IB HL Calculus exam or an A in A-Level Mathematics should begin with Calculus III, or Honors Math A. They do not need to take Calculus II.
  • with a score of 4 on the Calculus BC Advanced Placement exam, or a score of 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB Advanced Placement exam, or a 6 on the IB HL Calculus exam or a B in A-Level Mathematics, or a grade of A in a full year of high school calculus may begin with either Calculus II or Calculus III. Note that such students who decide to start with Calculus III may still need to take Calculus II since it is a requirement or prerequisite for other courses. In particular, they MUST take Calculus II before going on to Calculus IV.
  • all others should start with Calculus I.
  • prospective Economics majors should consult the Economics department Math Requirements page).

Those with a score of 4 or 5 on the AB exam or 4 on the BC exam may receive 3 points of AP credit upon completion of either Calculus II or Calculus III with a grade of C or higher. They will not receive AP credit if they take Calculus I.

Those with a score of 5 on the BC exam may receive 6 points of AP credit upon completion of Calculus III with a grade of C or higher. They will not receive AP credit if they take Calculus I or II.

Honors mathematics A: Students who want a proof-oriented theoretical sequence and have a score of 5 on the BC AP exam may begin with Honors mathematics A, which is especially designed for mathematics majors. Upon completion of this course with a grade of C or higher, they may receive 6 points of AP credit.

Contacts

For questions either contact your instructor or the relevant person below.

Director of Undergraduate StudiesProfessor Panagiota Daskalopoulos

Calculus Director: Professor Robert Lipshitz

Undergraduate Administrative Assistant: TBA

WebAssign

Some sections of all Calculus classes will be using WebAssign, an on-line system integrated with the course textbook.

Course Textbook

The print version of the textbook for Calculus I-IV is

James Stewart
Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 7th Edition

The textbook for the course is a bundled package which includes the print version of the textbook, and access codes for an electronic version of the book as well as the on-line WebAssign system.  This is

ISBN# 9781111649579

It is available from the publisher for the price of  $150.

Students also have the option to buy the eBook + WebAssign access (not including a physical textbook, WebAssign access is for multiple semesters) from the publisherfor $95, this is

ISBN# 9781285184210

Access to WebAssign is only required for students in those sections of Calculus that will be using it to assign homework problems. In other cases it is optional, but students may find it a useful study tool.

Access to WebAssign and the eBook version of the textbook for one semester can be purchased directly from WebAssign after enrolling in the appropriate class there. The price is $75 for one semester, $110 for multiple terms (usable if you take more than one semester of Calculus). It is no longer possible to purchase just access to WebAssign, it is sold together with the eBook.

The textbook package is also available at the bookstore at significantly higher cost.

The book store may also be selling a slightly cheaper “Single Variable” version of the textbook which is usable if you only take Calculus I and/or II, but does not contain the material used in Calculus III and IV.

The publisher also sells a cheaper “Hybrid” version of the print textbook that doesn’t contain the problems, and is intended to be sold together with WebAssign access. Note that this version of the textbook does not contain the problems, so you need the eBook or some other way to access the book problems you will be assigned if you purchase this version.

Note that used versions of the textbook will not come with WebAssign access. In addition prices for used copies of the 7th edition of the textbook will be higher since it is relatively new. In principle, students may be able to use copies of the 6th edition, which has much the same content, although the numbering of problems is different.

 

Syllabi

While different instructors will choose to cover somewhat different topics, we have a web-page giving suggested and typical syllabi for the four courses in the Calculus sequence.

Frequently Asked Questions

 


Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Is it possible to switch between sections, levels and sequences of calculus?
A: Students can always go to the first few lectures of one Calculus class and then, if it seems appropriate, switch to another level or a different sequence. Such transfers require the approval of the instructors and, after the drop/add date, the class dean.

Q: I am not sure that, following department guidelines, the scores on my AP exam place me in the appropriate section. What should I do?
A: These are guidelines only, but they are based on years of experience.

Q: How does Advanced Placement credit work?
A: See the discussion under placement.

Q: What pocket calculator should I get?
A: Calculators are not allowed in Calculus exams. You do not need a calculator.

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