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In Memoriam – Steven M. Zelditch

Professor Steven M. Zelditch of Northwestern University passed away on September 11, 2022, two days short of his 69th birthday. He was a Ritt Assistant Professor at Columbia University from 1981 to 1985 where, among many important works, he laid down the foundations for a geometric theory of quantum chaos. He was well-loved and respected by all those who knew him, and his memory will live on in the Columbia Mathematics department.

https://sites.math.northwestern.edu/steve_zelditch/

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SEPTEMBER 14: Jinyoung Park

Abstract: For a finite set X, a family F of subsets of X is said to be increasing if any set A that contains B in F is also in F. The p-biased product measure of F increases as p increases from 0 to 1, and often exhibits a drastic change around a specific value, which is called a “threshold.” Thresholds of increasing families have been of great historical interest and a central focus of the study of random discrete structures (e.g. random graphs and hypergraphs), with estimation of thresholds for specific properties the subject of some of the most challenging work in the area. In 2006, Jeff Kahn and Gil Kalai conjectured that a natural (and often easy to calculate) lower bound q(F) (which we refer to as the “expectation-threshold”) for the threshold is in fact never far from its actual value. The positive answer to this conjecture enables one to narrow down the location of thresholds for any increasing properties in a tiny window. In particular, this easily implies several previously very difficult results in probabilistic combinatorics such as thresholds for perfect hypergraph matchings (Johansson–Kahn–Vu) and bounded-degree spanning trees (Montgomery). In this talk, I will present the recent resolution of the Kahn-Kalai Conjecture, along with some preceding work around this topic. Based on joint work with Keith Frankston, Jeff Kahn, Bhargav Narayanan, and Huy Tuan Pham.

Where: Mathematics Hall, room 520
When: Wednesday, September 14, 2022 at 04:30pm

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FALL 2022 SAMUEL EILENBERG LECTURES

LECTURES ON LOCAL SYSTEMS IN ALGEBRAIC-ARITHMETIC GEOMETRY”

Abstract: The topological fundamental group of a smooth  complex algebraic variety is poorly understood. One way to approach it is to consider its complex linear representations modulo conjugation, that is  complex local systems. One fundamental problem is to recognize those coming from geometry, and more generally subloci of the moduli space of local systems with special arithmetic properties. This is the object of deep conjectures. We’ll study some consequences of those, notably integrality and crystallinity properties.

Tuesdays at 2:40 pm

Room 520, Mathematics Hall

2990 Broadway (117th Street)

First lecture: September 13, 2022

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Algebraic Geometry, Mathematical Physics, and Solitons “A conference in honor of Professor Igor Krichever”

The “Algebraic Geometry, Mathematical Physics, and Solitons” conference will take place on Friday, October 7 through Sunday, October 9, 2022. Columbia University, Mathematics department will be hosting this event in honor of Professor Igor Krichever.

Registration is required. To access the conference schedule, please visit the website below.

A conference on connections between and applications of
integrable systems in algebra, geometry, and physics: Conference webpage

2990 Broadway

Mathematics Hall, room 312

New York, N.Y. 10027

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Reflections on Geometry: 3-Manifolds, Groups and Singularities “A Conference in Honor of Walter Neumann”

The “Reflections on Geometry: 3-Manifolds, Groups and Singularities” conference will take place on Tuesday, June 7 through Friday, June 10, 2022. Columbia University, Mathematics department will be hosting this event in honor of Professor Walter Neumann.

Registration is required. To access the conference schedule, please visit the website below.

Conference webpage

2990 Broadway

Mathematics Hall, room 312

New York, N.Y. 10027

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Columbia University Students Placed First in the MCM Competition!

“COMAP is pleased to announce the results of the 38th annual Mathematical Contest in Modeling (MCM). This year, 15,105 teams representing institutions from twenty-two countries/regions participated in the contest. Twenty-Three teams from the following institutions were designated as OUTSTANDING WINNERS:”-For more information, please visit website.

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Michael Harris elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Please join us in congratulating Professor Michael Harris on his recent election to the National Academy of Sciences!

For more information, visit the NAS press release: http://www.nasonline.org/news-and-multimedia/news/2022-nas-election.html

 

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Amol Aggarwal Awarded the 2022 Rollo Davidson Prize

Congratulations to Amol Aggarwal for being awarded the prestigious Rollo Davidson prize in Probability for 2022.

This award recognizes Professor Aggarwal’s outstanding achievements in the area of random matrix theory and integrable probability.

More information can be found here.

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Panagiota Daskalopoulos elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences!

Please congratulate Professor Panagiota Daskalopoulos, who was recently elected as a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences!

“Academy President David W. Oxtoby and Chair of the Board of Directors Nancy C. Andrews have announced that 261 outstanding individuals have been elected to the Academy in 2022. The new members are listed below, starting with a complete list in alphabetical order followed by members organized by area and specialty. International Honorary Members are indicated with (IHM) after their names. Information about members elected in prior years is in our member directory. ”

For a complete list of the 2022 members, including Professor Panagiota Daskalopoulos, please visit:
https://www.amacad.org/content/members/newFellows.aspx?s=c

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Ivan Corwin selected as a 2022 Simons Investigator

Congratulations to Professor Ivan Corwin, who was recently selected as a 2022 Simons Investigator!

Simon Investigators are outstanding scientists who receive long-term research support from the Simons Foundation. This is intended to support the scientist during their most productive years, when they are establishing creative new research directions, providing leadership to the field, and effectively mentoring junior scientists. For more information about the Simons Foundation and this award, visit their webpage:

 

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